Last name: Burns

This interesting surname is of early medieval English origin, and is a locational name from Burnhouse in Scotland. The placename derives from the Middle English "burn", stream, and "house", house. During the Middle Ages, when migration for the purpose of job-seeking was becoming more common, people often used their former village or hamlet name as a means of identification, resulting in a wide distribution of the name in the surrounding areas. The surname is first recorded in Yorkshire in the early 13th Century (see below), over three hundred years before it is found in Scotland. David Burnis is listed as being a follower of the earl of Cassilis in 1526. In the modern idiom the surname can be found as Burness, Burnes and Burns. On June 5th 1608, Bessie Burnes married Charles Bryson in Edinburgh, Midlothian, and on September 28th 1760, Gilbert, son of William and Agnes Burness was christened at Alloway, Ayr. A Coat of Arms granted to the family is a gold shield, and on a blue fess, between two black spur rowels in chief and a black hunting horn stringed in base, a gold water bouget, the Crest being a demi-Pegasus, winged gold. The Motto, "Perseverantia vincit", translates as, "Perseverance Conquers". The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Robert Brenhus, which was dated 1208, in the "Pipe Rolls of Yorkshire", during the reign of King John, known as "Lackland", 1199 - 1216. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

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Robert Burns
I've traced my Italian side back to the 1600, BUT the Irish?????? All I've gotten back to is my Burns family coming to the US in 1860 and living in Baltimore Maryland.
What steps should I take to get back to Ireland? I've been working on this for years.

Lynn Burns
Just read that the name BURNS is Scottish as far back as 1327, under King Edward I of England. The Burns Clan were called the "unruly ones," and held territory on the north borders of England . Clan Burns has it own tartan and shield, very pretty too. We had researched genealogy for years and thought Burns were sects of Clan Campbell, glad to find we have our own clan.

Graham Burns
Whilst correct for the English/Scots origin of the name, there is a completely seperate origin which would account for most of those of Irish origin that maintain a Catholic tradition in their family (due to the fact that families generally maintain these traditions, and most English/Scots rooted families would have been of the Protestant faith, with very little reason to convert to Catholicism, given the times). Many Irish Burns (like myself) would more likely originate from an alternative anglicisation of Ó Broin (a root shared with the Byrne, O'Byrne, Byrnes), which was the Wicklow/Kildare based clan of Bran, whose probable origin is Bran mac Máelmórda, King of Leinster, deposed in 1018. Bran means Raven, if you fancy a family totem.

roney
I have often wondered about this with my Grandpa having the surname Burns. He was born in Shropshire, records so far show he of irish descent - strangely enough he married an english girl of irish descent, up to now I have traced both their origins to Ireland,maternal side south west. All interesting research, love it would do it all day if it was possible!

Christy Burns-Powell
My dad has been chasing our geliology for some time now. He has fallowed our roots to 3 generations that lived in Germany, and then he got stuck. :(

Frank Burns
I was told by my father that we were Scottish and Irish and by all I've read this makes a lot of sense. My Father was James and his father from what he told me was Henry or Henny or Hendrick. My father was born in NYC in 1918. Anyway I would like to say Hi ! to all you Burns's. So Hi from Frank.

Katherine Burns
i did not know the last name Burns is comon.my name is relly Katherine danieell burns

Maureen Burns-Murtha
As my father always told us; "We are Irish! If anyone ever tries to tell you that we came from Soctland or England, politely explain that our ancestors were very strong swimmers and made it to the Emerald Isle". Erin go Bragh! :)

Andrew J Burns
I am getting my dna tested to see where my roots REALLY come from. :)

Bryan Burns
That is crazy! I've always wondered where my last name came from... Didn't think that it was of scottish decent... My fathers maiden last name is burns and my grandfather also (lord rest his soul).

I W
No such thing as "father's maiden name". A maiden name is a woman's surname at birth, not a man's.

Barbara Burns
My cousin did extensive research on our family name.We originated from County Mayo Ireland,,,,,

david burns
maiden names are for men in maternal tribes. Most Native Americans do it that way. A lot of Jewish tradition has similar stuff like that too.

Burns
Hi my da has a great uncle and my grandma is minogue from county Clare ... Irish here too... I also heard if you were a mutt the surname of your mothers parents is what you are? Anyone heard of this? Anyway W. Burns Ireland ..

rodney burns jr
I ran across a page when doing my own research into my ancestry. I was able to trace the line directly back to a John Burns and Sarah McWilliams, of Country Cork Ireland. I've seen that some of the previous posters have mentioned Cork, so hopefully this page may be of some interest. http://wordslessspoken.com/wildwood-plantation/ Let me know if you have any further information regarding these two, as my research hits a snag with them. However, I do have more information coming towards present day. Of course I am willing to share if it would help.

Graham Burns
Whilst correct for the English/Scots origin of the name, there is a completely seperate origin which would account for most of those of Irish origin that maintain a Catholic tradition in their family (due to the fact that families generally maintain these traditions, and most English/Scots rooted families would have been of the Protestant faith, with very little reason to convert to Catholicism, given the times). Many Irish Burns (like myself) would more likely originate from an alternative anglicisation of Ó Broin (a root shared with the Byrne, O'Byrne, Byrnes), which was the Wicklow/Kildare based clan of Bran, whose probable origin is Bran mac Máelmórda, King of Leinster, deposed in 1018. Bran means Raven, if you fancy a family totem.

Roy Burns
I'm also an Irish Burns and I have had my DNA analysed which places me in the O'Broin Clan (O'Byrne,Byrne,Burns). The name Burns, as found in Ireland, is an anglicization of the Gaelic name O'Brion. Many people confuse the Irish and Scottish versions of the surname. The O'Brion clan originated in Wicklow with clusters of the family name to be found today in the north and west of Ireland and of course in all of our ancestors who emmigrated to America, Australia etc. The most famous of the O'Brion clan was Fiach MacHugh O'Byrne who defeated the English in 1580 when they invaded his clan's stronghold in Wicklow during the Desmond Rebellions. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Glenmalure I can only trace my surname back to Belfast in 1850 where my G/G/Grandfather, who was a postman, was born. His father was a publican but the trail dries up at that point in time. Researching Irish names is complicated by numerous factors. The O'Brion name, for example, was changed into various English versions and spellings (and for various reasons), plus Irish Catholic records are sparodical because of the Penal Laws which prohibited the practice of the Catholic faith, including the keeping of records. However some parishes managed to maintain records of births, deaths and marriages regardless of the consequences. With some dectective work it may be possible to find leads in some Church records,street directories,census records, emmigrant ship manifests etc and by visiting local graveyards.

jason burns
i am a Burns and have traced and found family in cork and wicklow ireland. but if we go further into it i found that we where a old race called the Boernicians who split and migrated to england, scottland, Germany and ireland. the Burns have a castle in wicklow

Stewart Burns
I'm even more confused now, lol. One minute I'm told my surname derives from Scotland, which would make a lot of sense with our own Tartan and Robbie Burns. Having said that, a relative of mine is tracing our family tree and he is now adamant we originated from Ireland.

N. Burns
They could possibly be Scots-Irish (Ulster-Scots), i.e. Scots who settled in Ulster during the Plantations from the early 1600's.

m.burns
this is a real mess

dana burns kownick
There is Burns in Scotland. There is plenty of information online about it. My grandmother was an irish burns and her father came over. She married a scottish burns believe it or not. I've spoken with some irish and they say the name is usually an Scots/Irish name from Ulster. Makes sense as they probably came over from Scotland and settled in Northern Ireland-Derry is where I think they were. I just had my DNA tested...waiting for results.