Last name: Cox

This interesting surname has a number of possible origins. Firstly, it may have originated as a nickname from the bird, the cock, deriving from the Olde English pre 7th Century "cocc", and applied to a young lad who strutted proudly like a cock. The nickname may also have referred to a natural leader, or an early riser, or a lusty or aggressive individual. It may also have derived from the Olde English personal names "Cocc" or "Cocca", found in placenames, although not on independent record. But as "cock" became a common term for a boy, it may also have been used affectionately as a personal name. The third possibility is that it may be of topographical origin for a "dweller by the hill", deriving from the Olde English "cocc" meaning haycock, heap or hillock. In London it probably originated from the sign of a house or inn. One William le Cock, appears in the Staffordshire Forest Pleas (1271) and Hugh ate Cocke, is noted in the Subsidy Rolls of London (1319). In the modern idiom the surname has many variant spellings including Cock, Cocke and Cocks. On October 18th 1556, Alicea Cox married Burkrave Westdrop at St. Martin in the Fields, Westminster, London. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Aluuinus Coc, which was dated 1086, in the Domesday Book of Cambridgeshire, during the reign of King William 1, known as "The Conqueror", 1066 - 1086. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

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Mark Cox (Cape Town South Africa)
Interesting to know all these various origins... hehehehehe

ROSALIE DEMARTINO

6/23/2014: Anybody related to GEORGE W. COX, 1824--1901, and his wife, Hannah E. Annie Cox, who died in 1865, Nebraska. She may have been born 1825--1828, and be our missing relative. So hard to find her connections, parents, siblings, faith, travels, and she had two daughters, Ella Gilbert and Winnie P. Aughe. Looking for accurate connections & descendants. thank you, ROSALIE DEMARTINO

Colin Cox
I always thought it was Scottish???

Dafydd ap Ffranc
My mam's mam's family were Cox and it is a different origin to the English surname. It is an Anglicised form of 'Coch' meaning red in Welsh. And was often used in the middle ages as a monica for some one with red hair.

Gemma Cox
Yep you're completely right, my dad is from the south of Wales and it does come from the word coch, pretty perfect for my grandad - he was a redhead like me :)

Nathaly Villalta
wait... u have the same name of harry styles sister :D

Matt Cox
not true

Ricky Cox
anglised in Ireland from mac cuchoille

Andy cox (bath, somerset)
May well be of Celtic origin, BUT lots of Cox's in my home city and somerset in general, also a few down in Cornwall (Kernow) I may not be a anglo saxon after all????? more celt then some in Cornwall ??????

Roylee Cox
Cool. Never knew it! :)

deshawn cox
this is very intresting im trying to learn about my heratage for a progect in my class im 14 teen and these is an eye opener

arlene cox

My great, great uncle, who's name was Frederick Cox, looked up our family tree and found out that our great ancestors were pirates.