Last name: Romney

This interesting surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is lcoational from a place so called in Kent, which was originally the name of a river. The first element seems to be derived from the Old English pre 7th Century "rum", spacious, but its formation and meaning are obscure. The second element is derived from the Old English "ea", river. The placename was first recorded as "Rumenea" in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles of Essex in 1052. A derivative of Romney is found recorded as "Ruminingseta" in the Saxon Charters of 697, and means "the fold of the Romney people". Locational surnames were developed when former inhabitants of a place moved to another area, usually to seek work, and were best identified by the name of their birthplace. The modern surname can be found as Romney and Rumney. An early emigrant to America was one Thomas Romney, aged nineteen years, who set sail from London on the "Speedwell", bound for "Virginea" in May 1635. The christening was recorded in Kent of Daniell, son of Richard Romney, on December 8th 1594 at Davington. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Robert de Romenel, which was dated 1086, The Domesday Book of Kent, during the reign of King William 1, "The Conqueror", 1066 - 1087. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

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Carl
Please, Prasaad, settle things by reasoning, not outright hate. Nobody is against you. Just misinformed probably, and you seem to know what you're talking about. People don't need to see angry arguments when looking for their family origins.

Mari Tsigianis
Yeah, like anyone connected to Romney would admit to "Romany" or "Romani" roots. Prasaad. Romney is a liar and an actor who will do and say anything to get elected as President of the United States. Being part Roma myself, I see how people react when they find out a person is Roma. All of a sudden the "hide your wallet" jokes come out. Maybe the name is Roma, maybe it isn't - but nothing changes my bad opinion of the man. Just sayin'.

Mike Craig
Prasaad-it is clearly you that is making things up then trying to hammer home your lie! Kent was NEVER part of the Danelaw!! The Danelaw started North of London and ran in a diagonal line to just south of Liverpool. Encompassing all of the kingdom of East Anglia, half of the kingdom of Mercia (when England was united as one they became Earldoms) and everything north of those places. You are also incorrect about the origins of the names Kent and bury, niether of which are Norse in origin! The "cant" part of the towns name is ancient British (the ancient Britons are a Celtic people) and was given by the Romans, named for the tribe who lived there, the Cantii. Also the "bury" part of the towns name is wholly Anglo Saxon and stems from the Old English (the language spoken by the Anglo Saxons) 'burh' ( also the origin of the word borough), which was a defensive structure of tall earthen ramparts with a palisade of wood built atop (see the Dorset town of Wareham where the bank still exists to its original height). These were devised by King Alfred the Great to defend towns from Viking attacks, the only link between that word and the Danes. The only thing you got right was about the Jutes, who were the other Germanic tribe who came with the Angles and Saxons, however they were much smaller in number which led to those in Kent (this word has the same origins as 'cant', from the Britons via the Romans) being absorbed by the Angles and Saxons, those who settled on the Isle of Wight (named after the Jutish king Whitgar) were ethnically cleansed by the Saxon Kingdom of Wessex. I have studied this subject for twenty years and have a degree in Dark Age Europe, believe me I know what im talking about! Also the name Romney is mentioned in the Domesday book and IS English in origin but iv typed too much to go into detail on that too! All of the above is in the public domain and readily available which makes me wonder why you did not research your answer before looking foolish?