Last name: Bass

This famous surname is both English and occasionally, Scottish. In the first instance it may have Olde English pre 7th century origins, or it maybe French, and as such was introduced by the Normans after the 1066 Invasion. Taking the latter first as this is the most satisfactory explanation, the derivation is from the French word 'basse' meaning somebody who was both broad and thickset. This word itself is a development of the Latin "bassus", meaning wide, as opposed to tall. As such it was a descriptive nickname, ostensibly for somebody of that description, but given the sardonic humour of the Middle ages, quite possibly the reverse! The second possibility is that the surname is a metonymic occupational name for a fishseller, as with the surname 'Herring'. Medieval job descriptions were generally specific, although it is difficult to imagine that people lived by selling or catching only one type of fish. However if this was the case the derivation is from the Olde English pre 7th Century "baes", meaning bass. Lastly, if Scottish the name may be locational from a place called Bass in the Grampian region of Scotland. In this case the place name derives from the Gaelic word "bathais", meaning front or forehead. Early examples of the name recording include Osbert Bars in the pipe rolls of Gloucester in 1205, whilst Andrew de Bas of Aberdeen was a juror there in the year 1206. A notable namebearer, listed in the "Dictionary of National Biography", was Michael Thomas Bass (1799 - 1884), a brewer, who was an active social reformer, and M.P. for Derby. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Aelizia Bass, which was dated 1180, in the "Pipe Rolls of Warwickshire", during the reign of King Henry 11, known as "The church builder", 1154 - 1189. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

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Steven T. Bass
My branch of Bass is kin to the outlaw Sam Bass. My grandfather to me a story his grandfather had told him. My great great grandfather's great aunt had died and the family gathered for her funeral. Following her funeral the family went to her house to divy up the belongings amongst the family. After everything had been passed out all the children were made to go outside and play and the women were made to stay in the living room. The men then went into the back room of the house. Most of the children did play, however my great great grandfather and his brother and cousin went around the side of the house and looked into the window of the back room. From the door to the attic in the back room two of the younger men brought down an old trunk covered in an old quilt. They set the trunk down on a table and pulld the quilt off. On the front was burned in "PROPERTY OF S. BASS". The men pulled papers and clothes and other items from the trunk and passed them out. Then something different was pulled from the trunk. Several WANTED posters and a gunbelt on which a brass buckle with the initials S.B. were on it. Then men fell silent in the room as the oldest man in the room took the WANTED posters and placed them into the furnace in the backroom. He then told the other men to put the gunbelt back into the trunk and to make sure it did not come back. He then said that they should not speak of this as to be rid of the association to the bad seed of our family. Now whatever that happened to the trunk and gunbelt I do not know but when my granfather died my great uncle gave my father something he said he had benn holding for my grandfather and said it had been in the family for a long time. It was an old falling apart trunk that was missing the namepiece on the front. My dad asked were it came from and my great uncle said his great grand father passed it down through the family.

Stacey Nicole Bass
Hello Bass Families=D I have lots to write about! I don't know where to start. I haven't signed up or logged in so we will see if my comment even posts. I'll start out with a little then later more so. I come from a Bass Family where anyone distant never seemed to stay close or in touch. My dad is EDWARD WAYNE BASS. My dad's dad, my Grandpa, Albert Edward Bass lived and died in Missouri. Albert Edward's parents were John Bass and Mary Prahl Bass. Prahl being Mary's maiden name, she was full blooded German, refused to speak English. John and Mary Bass had 5 children; Albert Edward, James Michael(they called him Jr.), Ralph Eugene, Billy Ray, and Mildred. My grandpa was General McArthur's radio man in World War 2. My dad told me a story that grandpa told him, a war story. Grandpa remembered having to have to deliver a message to General McArthur. He walked into his tent, and woke him up by grabbing General McArthur's big toe and pulling it=D I remember grandpa telling us a gruesome war story at the dinner table when I WAS 5! I may tell that one later on down the line. I don't think John Bass was a nice dude. James Michael didn't turn out good neither. Just know about grandpa and his siblings. Grandpa evidently never spoke much of his father. Grandpa and siblings live or died in Missouri. Anyone take a gander at this and help me out. Would love to find distant family to Facebook. I have pictures to.

Stacey Nicole Bass
BTW, Bass Families, I'm thinking just maybe it is an Italian name from BASSO. My dad was told growing up Bass was German, but if they lived in Germany, I imagine they started out in Italy. This being said only because their skin is dark, dark like golden Italians, all year round. Dark features, pronounced chin, rounded shoulders, and short. I remember family get togethers and one of my dad's uncles looked like Dustin Hoffman and another looked like Robert De Niro. My Aunt Joyce- Uncle Ralph's wife has a genealogy book and told me a story that one of the Bass women ran an underground laundering service in Germany, where she was from. I would be surprised to find out my dark complected Bass family was from England.

Stacey Nicole Bass My father Edward Wayne Bass and my mom Connie Jean Skirvin Bass The 2 ladies holding the baby boy. My Grandma Woodward, my Grandma Hattie Woodward Bass's mom and her grandma. My great, great grandma is full blooded Cherokee Indian.

Stacey Nicole Bass!/photo.php?fbid=2919902057259&set=a.2921423855303.100646.1852041408&type=3&theater This here pic is me and my Grandpa Albert Edward Bass

RJ Bass
I'm from merry old England as my father is adopted I have inherited the name from my adoptive paternal grandfather who originates from south London been told its Portuguese in origin also and to clear this mix up of pronounciation people have what's your preferred way bass as in music or the fish?

William Cody Bass
What I've researched I've found out tha the name Bass is actually french and also Huguenot name. The Huguenots fled France during the war and settled around ireland,Scotland, and England.

Matthew Bass

My sisters name is Alisha but she's currently living over at Wyoming and playing soccer over there too and my parents names are Margaret and Craig

Daniel Stanwix

My name is Daniel Stanwix and I have a family name in my street who's surname is Bass

Michael Bass

Bass is also Jewish family name

Janine Bass

I've tried to grow my family tree though can't get passed my grandad who came out to Australia from England in the 1940s when my dad was a child. My grandad grew up in a poorhouse/workhouse in London and we only have a birth extract for him. Really frustrating as none of my aunts and uncles (or my dad for that matter) remember too many details of family stories, seems like it was a time he would have rather forgotten.