Last name: Lightowler

Recorded in several spellings including Lightowler, Lightoller, Lightollers, and Lightowlers, this is an English locational surname of early medieval origins. It derives from a place called Lightollers or Lightowlers, formerly a manorial estate in the parish of Stockport, Cheshire. A number of explanations have been offered for the meaning, the best explanation is that it is a development of the Olde English pre 7th century "liste-alr", meaning "a copse of light alder trees", or similar. Locational surnames were usually the first to be created, and certainly the first known recording of this surname is one of the earliest on record (see below). Examples of the recordings taken from authentic charters and registers include John Lightowlers of Withnell, in the register known as "Lancashire Inquistions" for the year 1606, Robert Lightowler of Wyndybank, in the Wills Register of Chester, in 1620, and John Lightollers, christened at St James church, Clerkenwell, London, in 1621. The first known recording is believed to be that of Michael de Lightholes, in the register of the abbey of Whalley, in the year 1250. This was in the reign of King Henry 111rd of England, 1216 - 1272.

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Paul Lightowlers
Hi Shauna I have been researching the family name for a few years now - as far as I know Lightowlers as a name has one root, being a locational surname from Littleborough (so I think we're all related). At the time of the work that led me to produce the text you quote from my site lightowlers.yolasite.com, I was unsure of a strong Viking connection with the area; at the bottom of the page you quote I added a link in March 2010 - it would appear that there could be a strong Viking link. So I started looking at the Norse language - Liht in Norse means 'to dye' and Aler as per most other languages of the time means Alder tree. Dyeing Alder trees actually makes much more sense than sparse copse of Alder trees (Alder tends to grow in dense thickets near to water); one of the properties of Alder is that it makes a strong dye. This would give much more of a reason to name the area I think. You will come across Dave Bland's name on the Internet if you are researching our name - Dave has done much more work than I have. Regards Paul Lightowlers

Shauna lightowlers
Hi Paul would just like to thank you for getting back to me. good luck with your research Kind regard Shauna

David
Have come across a George Lightowle?? - not sure of last character(s).He served in the Royal Fusiliers in East Africa in 1915. I have something of his. Contact me on dasedgwick@gmail.com if interested. David

Shauna Lightowlers
Ive being curious as to track my family history, its interesting where the name originates. Although it seems there are many translations for the name. im wondering how many Lightowlers are related. Lightowlers in middle English is a direct translation from Lihtolers (Lihtolres, Lihtalres or Lihtalers) in old English (low saxon). Light (Liht) meaning sparse or not dense, and owlers (olers etc.) meaning Alder trees. In Littleborough in the 13th Century it appears that Lightowlers was the name of an estate and a farm, but the owners were Lihtolres. Which came first the place name or the surname? Are we descendents of Saxons, Normans, Brigantes or Vikings or even Romans?

kevin lightowler
i also go with the theroy of the name from the light elder tree also from rochdale which i belive belonged to yorkshire not lancshire

Anthony R Lightowler

Anthony R Lightowler. I had medals from the Boer war 1st +2nd world war some with lightowler on the edge of the medals all from yorkshire regiments.I originally come from leeds. With the sheer number of lightowler in yorkshire I would agree with Kevin that's where it's origins are