Last name: Rogers

This is a surname of English and sometimes Scottish, medieval origins. It is a patronymic form of Roger, which itself is of Norman-French origin, but from a Germanic personal name originally "Rodger". Composed of the elements "hrod", meaning renown, and gari, a spear, it was introduced into England by the Normans after the Conquest of 1066. It reinforced the similar existing pre 7th century Anglo-Saxon name "Hrothgar", the earliest reference to which is in "Beowulf", the epic poem of the Dark Ages. In England the name became very popular, as were its pet forms of Hodge and Dodge. The personal name was first recorded as "Rogerus" in the Domesday Book of 1086, whilst the surname itself is first recorded in the mid 13th Century (see below). Early examples of the surname recording include: William Rogger in the Subsidy Tax Rolls of the county of Sussex in 1296, whilst Henry Rogeres was recorded in the similar rolls, but for Worcestershire in 1327. Other early interesting recordings include Nathaniel Rogers (1598 - 1655), educated at Cambridge University in England, and his son John (1630 - 1684), who emigrated to the New England colony of Virginia in 1636. John Rogers became the president of Harvard University in 1682. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Richard Roger. This was dated 1263, in the "Archaeological Records" of the county of Kent, during the reign of King Henry 111 of England,1216 - 1272. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was sometimes known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries surnames in every country have continued to "develop", often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

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Sam Sandilla Jr.

I been trying the the missing root, of grand Mae Rogers. that came from Ireland, that moved from Cornwall. What I found out this much. On site. The name might of came after the Norman con. And some sites really don't know how far the last name goes. There is only one house of Rodgers, Rogers etc. The last name changes, like any other name. Glad I found this site. To hopefully fill the gaps.

JackieRogers
Hi my dad is Patrick Joseph Rogers he was born in Monaghan in 1945 he has a brother Kevin he did have a brother Eugene but passed away a sister Margaret she has passed and a sister Mary some where in Ireland.She did have a post office years ago there.Please let me know if anyone here thinks or know we could be related please.I have for a cousin in Birmingham.

Mike Rogers
If you want to see if you are genetically connected to other Rogers, check out FTDNA.com , the 12 marker test at $49 (currently) will get you to your "Haplogroup" a DNA type you will share will all other direct male (father, son, father son) descendants of your line. And, may connect you to genetic cousins you did not know existed. You don't have to be of predominantly European descent to match other males in your line. For example - Les - if your YDNA line came from a European ancestor, your YDNA will be the same as others from the same YDNA line regardless of apparent ethnicity. My family is predominantly of European origin - but you may be a close YDNA cousin. Until you test, there is no way of knowing.

C. Rogers
I am a Rogers that dropped the Ro"d"gers when my family came to New York, but our family is of German descent. I have found several places saying it is an English name derived from German language. But nowhere am I seeing German decent Rogders, or a history of the Surname. Any one have anything on that?

Makayla
My Father had just told me that my family came from Ireland and landed in New York, but my grandmother says we have German and Polish descent.

K. Rogers
Same here. German, Polish, and Irish. interesting...

Triston Rogers
I'm a Hocak Winnebago Native American. My grandfather was the whitest guy IN THE WORLD! He was Irish, and a slew of other things I wish I could have asked about. If it means anything, his daughter from his previous marriage (before he found a Winnebago Woman) traced the name back to Denmark, a few hundred years ago. It's kinda crazy to me because my Grandmother's half, I myself can trace all the way back to the Wisconsin area before the French came over, but my Grandfather's side, I would need countless resources and scientists to go over the sea and far away.

Simon Rogers
as u see i am a rogers and dating back using my coat of arms and from my mothers side aswell clegg means i am 100% anglo saxon. the name was given to a skilled person as in skilled in war with arms not only this the saxons came in tribes and many of them where from close or in german lands in my case traveling into france and then the uk as we call it. now after the norman conquest many with the name rogers traveled to irish lands and to the us ext if rodgers is spelled like this it could be and its also proven in other cases that the spelling of the age has no dictionary therefore not knowing the correct way to spell roger rogier rodgiers so many ways it was spelled wrong more than likely we have the same bloodline only dna can prove it the first rogers was dated in about 1050 as this is when tax was forced

Sam Sandilla Jr.

Mine came from Ireland. the name went all the way to Cornwall, and and the way to pre England. when it was next to France, some say it was either a French with later or German. where the English came from. I found this in back of a dict, with the history of languages. Later on some went to Americana , on even some of the Celts went all the way to Spain. and beyond the Celtic Empire, before the Roman one. Most the people that crashed in Mexico where mixed, with Celtic blood, and others too.

Les Rogers
We might be related, perhaps. If i become wealthy i'll do some oprah-style research!

Les Rogers
It's interesting to find out about the possibility of a sephardic connection with the name.

anthony rogers
I am also a Rogers of African American decent My grandfather is white but todays society doesn't have Any remorse for a half breed searching for answers.. I love all races that's what makes us ALL beautiful.

Les Rogers
Being of African-American descent my ancestors probably came from or had been a slave under one of the original "Rogers". Rogers surely isn't of any african origin.

Les
surnames as well as house addresses have a similar reason for coming into being. Where and who to collect money from.

-
Am a rogers of irish english ancestry

Keller
Rogers was originally the Irish surname McRory, anglicized from Mac Ruadhri, and originated in Counties Derry and Tyrone. It can also be an Anglo-Saxon English surname that originated in Cornwall, and even a Spanish and Portuguese surname that originated in Old Castile, in Spain.

markjcrogers
I am from the family line of MacRuairi/Rogers from Tyrone (Omagh/Gortin)... I know that there is a connection in Rogerstown Texas to this line....and there is a connection to Davy Crockett...they also went to North East US...reach out if you woUld like to discuss/investigate more!

Amy Rogers
Hmm. not sure bout my personal line to my name.. be interesting to hear what new things u guys find out though! alotta scottish type features in my family so maybe it comes from that way...

John Rogers
It would be interesting to see where in Ireland my line goes, my Great-Great-Great Grandfather immigrated to New York in 1848 but he came from Cork County, I don't know where he lived before that

James Rogers
Trying to connect the dots

A Rodgers
I am a RODGERS using the "D" and I'm African American I would love to know the origin of my last name :(

Sue Bell
John, my family is rogers and from cork as well.

Emma Rogers
I am Rogers from cornwall England I've been looking up the surname and found references to being a anglicized verious of Rodriquez. I did'nt really think much of it until i went to a local maratime in Charlestown, Uk. There was a display about pirates with a picture of Joey Rodriguez a.k.a Joseph Rogers.

Sam Sandilla Jr.

Some people of Cornish roots went to the top of Spain. and the Scots, and Irish did too, in Galicia (Spain) So in the times of the Roman empire. The blood got mixed. With Celtic, and Italy. When the people of Spain hit, in Mexico. They had these genes. That went in the people of the land. That spread all the way through Central America and the Islands.